NHS Lothian
Search
Help

worry

Self-help strategies for Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
Self-help strategies for Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

Click the link below to download a PDF guide from Anxiety Canada. Worry Handout.pdf (668kb)

The Worry Tree
The Worry Tree

Click on the link below to download a diagram that outlines ways to deal with worry Worry Tree.pdf (57kb)

COVID-19 and Health Anxiety
COVID-19 and Health Anxiety

A resource sheet about Covid-19 Health Anxiety produced by Care First

Tips and resources for improving your self-esteem
Tips and resources for improving your self-esteem

There are lots of things you can do to improve your self-esteem. Try these helpful tips: Get positive. Write a list of things you like about yourself and forgive yourself when you can’t get everything right. Take care…

Tolerating Uncertainty
Tolerating Uncertainty

Dealing with uncertainty is an unavoidable part of daily life. Because we can’t see the future, we can never be certain about what exactly is going to happen day to day. Research has found that people vary in their ability to tolerate uncertainty. That is, some people are okay with having a lot of uncertainty in their lives, and other people cannot stand even a small amount of uncertainty.

Tools to help you manage your worries
Tools to help you manage your worries

There are lots of things that can help you manage your worries. Here are some helpful habits to have a go at:  Write down a list of your worries. Sometimes just writing things down can clear your…

What is generalised anxiety?
What is generalised anxiety?

This a self-help booklet designed to help you manage difficulties with worry by using strategies to manage the thoughts, behaviours and feelings associated with worry.

What is health anxiety
What is health anxiety

Most of us know what it’s like to worry about our health at some point in our life. But for some people, worries about being ill or becoming ill are overwhelming and begin to take over their life. This level of worry is called health anxiety

Feeling ‘on edge’
Feeling ‘on edge’

Feeling on edge or on high alert is also a common response to trauma. This can include feeling jumpy, jittery, shaky, easily startled, or having trouble concentrating or sleeping

Urgent Help

Emergency

If you, or someone you know, is in crisis and in imminent danger of causing harm to themselves or others, call 999 immediately

Help within 24 hours